This website uses advertising and analytics technologies.

FAMOUS CHECKMATES


Back-rank Checkmate

In this example, the white King on g1 is blocked by its Pawns; it is a Back-rank Checkmate, also known as Corridor Mate.


Fool's Mate

The Fool's Mate is 1.f3 e5 2.g4 Qh4#.

It is the checkmate with the fewest moves possible.


Scholar's Mate

The Scholar's Mate is 1.e4 e5 2.Qh5 Nc6 3.Bc4 Nf6 4.Qxf7#.


Smothered Mate

A Smothered Mate is a checkmate performed by a Knight where the checkmated King is blocked by its own pieces.

In this example, the black King on h8 is checkmated by the white Knight on f7; it is a Smothered Mate.


Smothered Mate - King's Pawn

The Smothered Mate - King's Pawn is 1.e4 e5 2.Ne2 Nc6 3.Nbc3 Nd4 4.g3 Nf3#.


Hippopotamus Mate

The Hippopotamus Mate is 1.e4 e5 2.Ne2 Qh4 3.Nbc3 Nc6 4.g3 Qg5 5.d4 Nxd4 6.Bxg5 Nf3#.


Légal Trap

The Légal Trap is 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 d6 3.Bc4 Bg4 4.Nc3 g6 5.Nxe5 Bxd1 6.Bxf7+ Ke7 7.Nd5#.


Blackburne Shilling Mate

The Blackburne Shilling Mate is 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bc4 Nd4 4.Nxe5 Qg5 5.Nxf7 Qxg2 6.Rf1 Qxe4+ 7.Be2 Nf3#.


Smothered Mate - Queen's Pawn

The Smothered Mate - Queen's Pawn is 1.d4 Nf6 2.c4 e5 3.dxe5 Ng4 4.Nf3 Nc6 5.Bf4 Bb4+ 6.Nbd2 Qe7 7.a3 Ngxe5 8.axb4 Nd3#.


Sea Cadet Mate

The Sea Cadet Mate is 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.d4 exd4 4.c3 dxc3 5.Nxc3 d6 6.Bc4 Bg4 7.0-0 Ne5 8.Nxe5 Bxd1 9.Bxf7+ Ke7 10.Nd5#.


Boden's Mate

The Boden's Mate is 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 d6 3.c3 f5 4.Bc4 Nf6 5.d4 fxe4 6.dxe5 exf3 7.exf6 Qxf6 8.gxf3 Nc6 9.f4 Bd7 10.Be3 0-0-0 11.Nd2 Re8 12.Qf3 Bf5 13.0-0-0 d5 14.Bxd5 Qxc3+ 15.bxc3 Ba3#.


Immortal Game

The Immortal Game was played by Adolf Anderssen and Lionel Kieseritzky on June 21, 1851, in London.

The Immortal Game is 1.e4 e5 2.f4 exf4 3.Bc4 Qh4+ 4.Kf1 b5 5.Bxb5 Nf6 6.Nf3 Qh6 7.d3 Nh5 8.Nh4 Qg5 9.Nf5 c6 10.Rg1 cxb5 11.g4 Nf6 12.h4 Qg6 13.h5 Qg5 14.Qf3 Ng8 15.Bxf4 Qf6 16.Nc3 Bc5 17.Nd5 Qxb2 18.Bd6 Qxa1+ 19.Ke2 Bxg1 20.e5 Na6 21.Nxg7+ Kd8 22.Qf6+ Nxf6 23.Be7#.

Adolf Anderssen sacrificed a Bishop, two Rooks, and the Queen, checkmating the opponent with his three remaining minor pieces.


Morphy VS Duke of Brunswick and Count Isouard

Paul Morphy played this game in 1858, in Paris, against the Duke Karl of Brunswick and Count Isouard.

The Morphy's game is 1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 d6 3.d4 Bg4 4.dxe5 Bxf3 5.Qxf3 dxe5 6.Bc4 Nf6 7.Qb3 Qe7 8.Nc3 c6 9.Bg5 b5 10.Nxb5 cxb5 11.Bxb5+ Nbd7 12.0-0-0 Rd8 13.Rxd7 Rxd7 14.Rd1 Qe6 15.Bxd7+ Nxd7 16.Qb8+ Nxb8 17.Rd8#.

This game shows the importance of the rapid development of the pieces and the efficacy of the sacrifices.